Pink Meth: The Realities of Strawberry Methamphetamine

Pink Meth

Pink Meth: The Realities of Strawberry Methamphetamine

Many people are familiar with methamphetamine or crystal meth, thanks to headlines or the news in general.

However, when the AMC show Breaking Bad became widely popular, it also helped bring the problems and dangers surrounding meth into the spotlight. At the same time though, the show also promoted unwanted interest in the product, especially regarding its iconic blue meth.

Colored meth isn’t fictional — and there are other colors, too. Long before Walter White’s ‘Blue Sky’ caught people’s attention, pink meth or strawberry meth caused panic among many parents and those concerned that kids might be targeted by such colors and flavors.

Keep reading to separate myths from realities about pink meth, and learn all about this unusual form of the drug!

What is Pink Meth?

What is Pink Meth

Pink meth is exactly as the name describes: it is a pink-colored version of methamphetamine. It is believed that the pink color typically comes from food coloring and strawberry flavor additives. As such, people have taken to also calling pink meth as strawberry quick meth.

The name also came from the pink meth’s resemblance to strawberry-flavored Nesquik powder, which drug dealers are said to have used to disguise their product.

At its core, though, pink meth functions much like clear, ordinary meth — from its use and effects to meth addiction risks and dangers.

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What Is Methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine or meth is a highly addictive stimulant. It’s a synthetic or man-made stimulant with a chemical composition that’s similar to amphetamine, a medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, a sleep disorder.

Taking meth notably increases your wakefulness and energy for physical activity. Meth also greatly raises the amount of dopamine in our brain, which produces euphoric effects. More dopamine in the reward areas of our brain also reinforces your desire to continue taking the drug, which leads to methamphetamine abuse.

Urban Myths Surrounding Pink Methamphetamine

The strawberry meth myth started a year before Breaking Bad became a household name. Back in 2007, news broke out that meth dealers in Arkansas, Missouri, and Nevada allegedly found a new way to appeal to younger audiences — food coloring and flavoring.

The Nevada Department of Public Safety put out a report in February 2007 regarding the seizure of pink methamphetamine in Carson City. They described the drug as “small, pink chunks” while reports made after the advisory noted the drug’s resemblance to rock candy.

The drug eventually became known as strawberry quick meth. News outlets reported that drug dealers add red coloring and flavoring to create strawberry or cherry-flavored methamphetamine. Aside from the pink color, this specific meth supposedly had a sweet taste as well. Drug dealers were said to have done these to attract more teenagers and young adults.

Rumors also spread that drug dealers used the candy-like appearance to sell the drug to kids. Even though there was no solid evidence pointing towards pink meth being sold to children, it still sent many parents and schools into a panic. Its appearance alone, which also resembles Pop Rocks and other candy, made this claim believable.

Life Imitating Art: Albuquerque’s Meth Candy

In recent years, a clever business in the Old Town of Albuquerque has taken this apocryphal story and given it a somewhat wholesome new spin. The Candy Lady now manufactures ‘Blue Magic’ rock candy shaped exactly like the famously pure blue meth created by the character of meth chemist, Walter White.

Regardless of their grounding in reality, claims of “Strawberry Quik Meth” became the foundation of the strawberry meth myth that persists to this day. The rumors and scandal grew so much that school groups and even government offices issued warnings.

These days, announcements and alarm about meth have largely been displaced by the reality of new P2P meth formulations that have increased purity and skirted US regulations on precursor chemicals through manufacture in Mexico.

This so-called ‘super meth’ has given rise to a greater array of side effects than even traditional forms of the drug and led to record numbers of meth overdose in recent years. While it isn’t typically colored or flavored, this trend is alarming and gives clear evidence of the need to effective meth rehab offerings such as those at Icarus Behavioral Health.

The Truth About Colored Crystal Meth

Truth About Colored Crystal Meth

Pink, strawberry flavor meth may have caused quite a scare, but it was still only a myth or sensational story. No proof was ever found that the drug was actually sold to or used by children.

Moreover, there is nothing to be gained by dealers giving away or selling products to kids who have limited money and are closely watched by their guardians. Even though the myth was debunked, some people continue to believe, and the rumors keep circulating to some degree.

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How Methamphetamine Can Have Different Colors

Meth can be produced using various methods, which leads to its different appearances. It can be sold as a fine powder, crystalline powder, or even as rock-like chunks. The color may also vary depending on the method used and the ingredients or additives.

There are different colors of meth: yellow, orange, white, brown, gray, or pink. Colored meth is believed to have a lower purity compared to clear crystal or “ice” meth. This is because of the addition of colorants, which may also double as adulterants or cutting agents to “extend” the drug. Another possible way for the drug to turn out a different color is a difference in the synthesizing process.

Increased Risk and Dangers for Teenagers

Even if pink meth isn’t sold to children, it still poses a higher risk of meth addiction among high schoolers or adolescents. The playful, pastel color can increase dangers of trying the drug and getting hooked on it simply by looking less serious than other illicit drugs.

However, under the harmless appearance of pink meth lies the very real risks and harmful effects that result from meth abuse.

Dangers of Methamphetamine Addiction

Dangers of Methamphetamine Addiction

Meth use is a widespread problem in the U.S. Almost 15% of all drug overdose deaths in 2017 were reported to involve meth use, and as mentioned earlier, this number has risen dramatically in recent years, even amid a headline-grabbing opioid epidemic.

Short-term negative effects of taking meth, whether pink or clear, include:

  • Decreased appetite
  • Rapid heart rate or irregular heartbeat
  • Faster breathing
  • Higher blood pressure
  • Increased body temperature

Repeated use of the drug notably results in methamphetamine addiction. Aside from this, other long-term negative effects include:

  • Extreme weight loss
  • Severe dental problems
  • Memory loss
  • Sleeping problems
  • Anxiety
  • Paranoia
  • Hallucinations

Additionally, studies suggest that while pink meth and other colors have the same effects and addicting quality as regular meth, they may be more toxic. Reports note that taking pink meth can cause gum abscesses, especially when injected.

Call for Immediate Help For Meth Addiction

Meth Addiction Treatment Options at Icarus Behavioral Health

At Icarus Behavioral Health, you or your loved one can receive compassionate and comprehensive care for methamphetamine addiction. With the help of the facility’s highly trained staff and expert medical professionals, you can achieve long-term recovery.

Icarus Behavioral Health offers treatment placement tailored to your specific requirements to ensure your return to full health. We conduct a thorough and confidential drug abuse or substance abuse assessment and create a treatment plan based on your individual needs.

No matter the color of meth you are struggling with, contact Icarus today to get the help and care you deserve… your recovery is waiting!

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